How do you deep clean your house?

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How can I clean my house fast and easy if I plan to do a full (deep) house cleaning?

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Here are some of the things you can do to deep clean your place, I hope it helps.

First, clear Away the Clutter. Before you embark on a deep clean, you’ll need to do a light one. Pick-up any items that have accumulated on the floor, on top of counters and table tops, or draped across furniture, so that you can get to the places you need to.

Create a Plan. Which rooms you’ll tackle and when, keeping in mind how much time you think it will take to do a thorough job.

Take Stock. Set yourself up for success by making sure you have everything you’ll need before you dig in. After getting started, the last thing you’ll want to do is mess up your rhythm by running out of something you need. Suggested supplies include:

Baking soda
Broom
Brush with stiff bristles
Cleaning caddy (optional, but helpful)
Dish soap
Dusting cloths (microfiber works best)
Garden hose (for yard work)
Gloves to protect your hands
Lint roller
Mineral oil
Mop
Multi-purpose cleaner
Sponges
Telescoping pole for high and hard-to-reach spaces
Vacuum cleaner with extension accessories
White vinegar
Window and glass cleaner
Wood cleaner and/or polish

The Bathroom

Scrub All Showers, Bathtubs, Sinks, and Toilets. Before getting started in the bathroom, spray down your tub with multi-purpose cleaner so that it can soak for a while and break up any soap and oil that have accumulated. Do the same with the toilet bowls and sinks. That will make scrubbing that much easier when you circle back to it later on.

Wipe Down Light Fixtures, Mirrors, and Window Treatments. Take extra time to carefully clean out gunk that has made its way into corners and around edges. Remove any grime or dust that has built up by wiping items down with a little vinegar on a damp rag.

Wash Glass Shower Doors. To clear off that soap scum or water spot, apply some warm distilled white vinegar and let it sit for a half an hour or so, reapplying if needed. Then sprinkle some baking soda on top, and gently scrub the spots away.

Clean Out Under the Sinks and Inside Drawers. Over time, these spaces tend to get cluttered. Take everything out so that you can wipe the bottom of the cabinets and drawers and clear out any cobwebs that might have formed.

Don’t Forget the Grout. You can make a homemade grout cleaner using vinegar, baking soda and water. First, spray down the grout with a half-vinegar/half-water solution until the area is good and saturated. Let it sit for a few minutes, scrub with a bristled brush (an old toothbrush will do!), and then rinse. Then, mix some baking soda with water until it forms a paste, apply it to the grout using your brush, and spray it with the water and vinegar. The bubbles that form will start to clean away some of the grit and grime, and your brush will do the rest. When you’re done, rinse the grout with warm water.

Disinfect Handles and Door Knobs. These neglected pieces of hardware are some of the germiest places in the house. If you haven’t wiped them down in a while, it’s a good idea to give them a thorough cleaning with a multi-purpose cleaner or disinfectant wipes.

Wipe Down Cabinets. With a damp rag, gently clean off any dust or dirt on the inside and outside of the cabinet doors, as well as all sides of the cabinets themselves — including the top. For grease-splatter, dip your cloth in undiluted vinegar to rub off the grease, then rinse the rag in warm water to wipe off the vinegar. Some cabinets will swell if they encounter too much moisture, so be sure to always ring out your rag well before wiping down the wood, and dry the surface quickly with a paper towel after cleaning.

Vacuum Out the Refrigerator Coils and Vent. Use the vacuum’s hose or brush extension to remove all the dirt and dust from the fridge coil and vent, or rent an air compressor to blow it out.

Clean Out the Fridge and Defrost the Freezer. Take everything out, so that you can remove food debris from the shelves and inside walls — starting from the top and working your way down. When you put food back, be sure to check expiration date, and toss anything that’s past its prime. Don’t forget to wipe down the fronts of the fridge and freezer, paying close attention to disinfecting the door handles.

Throw Out Old Sponges. These kitchen tools are germ magnets. Even zapping them in the microwave won’t kill all the bacteria that find their way inside. Disinfect sponges every few days by letting them soak in a bleach-water solution (¾ cup bleach to 1 gallon of water) for five minutes. After a couple of weeks, however, they should be thrown out completely and replaced, or swapped for reusable silicone scrubbers that can be more easily disinfected.

Scrub Down the Stove Top and Vent. For range hoods and stove tops covered in greasy dust, use a mineral oil to wipe away the film, then remove the oil with some warm water and dish soap.

Clean the Oven. If your oven doesn’t have a self-cleaning function, you can make a DIY cleaner by mixing 5 tablespoons of baking soda, 5 drops of dish soap, and 4 tablespoons of vinegar into a paste and slathering it on the worst spots. Let it sit for a few minutes, and then scrub at it with a sponge or non-abrasive brush. For extra stubborn grease stains, place a few drops of dish soap on half a lemon, and rub it on the problematic areas. Then, scrub or wipe it clean.

Organize the Pantry. After you’ve removed everything from the shelves and wiped them off, replace and organize the pantry items by purpose. For example, instead of having baking items stacked on a shelf or spread throughout the pantry, place all ingredients used exclusively for baking inside a clear bin or tub. That way, when you’re ready to make cookies, you already have everything you need and can easily carry the items to the counter and back. Similarly, use racks and clear containers to separate breakfast items from snacks or dinner ingredients, and so on.

Clean Out the Microwave. While a spaghetti-splattered microwave can seem daunting, this might be the easiest task in the whole kitchen. Mix a tablespoon of vinegar with a cup of water, and microwave it on high for 5 minutes. The vapor from the boiling solution will coat every inch of food debris, and make it easier to wipe away.

Disinfect the Sink. If you cook with raw meat in your home, chances are the kitchen sink is the germiest spot in the whole house. Give the basin a good scrub with a disinfectant or bleach solution to kill any bacteria lurking inside.

Wipe Down the Countertops. Remove any items on the counters, including appliances and knife blocks, and then use a disinfectant spray or cleaning wipes to get corners and spaces in the back that might not get as much attention throughout the year. While you’re there, wipe down the walls or backsplashes, too.

Wipe Down Baseboards, Window Treatments, Light Fixtures, and Ceiling Fans. Use a telescoping pole or the vacuum cleaner extension attachment to reach high ceilings and corners. Remove and launder the drapes, and clean the windows with glass cleaner.

Dust Your Decor. Gently wipe or brush away dust from all of your knick knacks, picture frames, and clocks. Depending on how many decorative items you keep in your home, this may be the most time-consuming activity you do during your spring cleaning.

Clean Your Electronics. Another germy place in your house? The TV remote. Just think of all the (sometimes sticky) hands that touch it. Give your electronics a good wipe down, including the top of your TV and DVD player. Dust the front of any screens with a microfiber rag or a feather duster, making sure to get the corners.

Flip Your Mattress. Or if you have a pillow top, rotate it to prevent grooves from forming due to sleeping in the same spot for too long. Freshen the mattress by spreading on some baking soda, letting it sit for 45 minutes to an hour, and vacuuming it back up.

Dust Neglected Surfaces, Like Window Treatments, Headboards, and Ceiling Fans. If you have drapes, vacuum or launder them, too.

Vacuum or Mop Under Furniture, Including Behind Dressers and Under Beds. Pay extra attention to corners and baseboards.

Rotate Seasonal Items. If you’re doing spring cleaning in the spring, pack up those bulky sweaters and heavy coats and store them on a shelf or in the back of your closet until next winter. The same can be done in the fall for summer clothing and accessories.

Vacuum Carpet and Ceilings. Remove any items from the floor, and vacuum up any dust that might have built up under your shoe rack or nostalgia box. Don’t forget to get into the corners of the ceiling to capture any cobwebs or dust bunnies.

Wipe Down Shelves and Inside Drawers. Remove all items, and wipe down the space with a damp rag. As you replace the items, think about how they can be organized so that you’re more likely to keep the space tidy.

Toss Any Rogue Dryer Sheets and Empty Detergent Bottles. Look between the machines, behind doors, and under cabinets to catch any pesky dryer sheets or lint clumps. Dispose of any outdated cleaning supplies, taking special care to follow your city’s instructions, as not all cleaning supplies can go in the regular municipal trash pick up.

Organize Supplies. If things have gotten a little cluttered, neatly line up cleaning supplies, so you can more easily see and access the items you need. If small children are in the home, ensure dangerous cleaning supplies are out of reach or kept in a secured cabinet.

Remove Items and Wipe Down Hooks and Shelves. Use a damp rag or multi-purpose cleaner to clean dirt off of any shelving and hooks, especially where shoes are kept.

Toss or Store Unused Items. Get rid of any items you no longer use or items family members have outgrown, including seasonal jackets or shoes. Wash and store items you want to keep, and donate or sell the rest.

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